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saying we ought to be reality-based and science-based. we need to go back to a science and reality-based approach to policymaking. and by the way, i sit on the armed services committee and who leads the fight on the climate change in a smart and 21st century way. it is the military because they know that energy security will benefit us. that there will be environmental benefits and that the job creation will help get our economy back. >> jennifer: they're defending our country to make us independent from foreign oil too. it is lives in our military. i gotta go. but senator i just so appreciate you joining me inside "the war room." you're thoughtful. you're a battler for the things that are important. hopefully we can get you more help after the election. thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >>. >> jennifer: up next, the president has numerous foreign policy achievements that he can claim. but what about mitt romney's foreign policy credentials other than insulting the british at the olympics? and there's a ne
viewed more than 4- 1/2 million times. in the video he says evolution is fundamental to all life science and parents should not encourage children to reject it. he produced this in response to efforts to present bible stories as a alternative to evolution in public schools. >>> a turn for a big rig accident. the driver lost control of a 18 wheeler filled with beer. it happened yesterday in downtown. the driver took the exit too fast that caused the rig to flip. it doesn't appear the driver was under the influence. >>> a condition called zombie bees has been discovered in washington. it causes bees to fly at night and lurch till they die. a bee keeper in washington found the first bees in that state. a biologist in san francisco discovered them in california in 2008. he uses a website to track it across the country. >>> mayor ed lee alawed the commission on -- applauded the commission on domestic violence. mayor ed lee said the commission helped cut domestic violence homicides by 80% and he promised to improve those numbers even more. >> to keep that work up. to keep the issues in front o
of georgetown's institute for law, science and global security. and i apologize if i butchered your last names. we will correct that in the feeds. >> it's great to be with all of you this morning i want to issue an apology if any of you are a twitter follower of mine. i have about 11,000 of them, and i guess yesterday they all got a little telling them that it just seemed and in this fantastic video. if you just clicked right your they could see it. at i think there is of a thousand friends, cycling through, this is the first time, it's ironic that i've ever fallen for one of the sort of cyber gags. i don't know what information they got from the, but nonetheless i wanted to kind of mentioned it and out myself as someone who is falling prey to the very folks out in cyber land. we have with us as mentioned katherine as executive director of georgetown institute for law, science and global security. she directs the global, george and cybersecurity project, and she also interestingly in the past, work with someone i'm well acquainted with, brent scowcroft from 2002-2006 as counsel to the presiden
that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of course available on the web at amazon always good things and i want to highlight it today because it is more of a gift we are going to give to our panel members for taking the time of their busy schedules to the very least i can promise you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second look at the potomac institute has been involved in over this past year is an effort with the bechtel corporation to look at the cyber issue, in particular the seibu doctrine. that volume edited by tim and i is in the publication of you have on you
for a politician. >> bill: jerry brown. >> we're looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. a self driving car. >> bill: i would be scared to death to know that there is a self driving car -- >> you can ride shotgun and drink. >> i love it. >> bill: take me home, please. >> i mean, could you drink if the car is driving? i would imagine not. >> no that has to do if there is an open container law in the state. but i think it's a cool concept -- >> bill: yeah in science fiction books. >> it could be cool. >> bill: how does it work? >> it uses gps -- >> bill: so you punch it in -- >> yeah. >> bill: think of all of the things that could go wrong. i'm driving down the baltimore, washington parkway yesterday, and there is a deer in the road. how is that freaking car going to see that -- >> in theory there is radar on the front bumper -- >> but when it screws up you say fickle non-driver. [ laughter ] >> you have to have some faith in science. >> bill: i have faith in science. i open the airplane windows like romney. [ laughter ] >> bill: neil king is with us and el
culinary classes to get jobs in our restaurant, computer science classes. >> reporter: city college of san francisco has till october 15 to submit an action plan aimed at turning around city college of san francisco. reporting live, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> california's community college system is getting a new leader. the next chancellor. he spent 16 years of chancellor. california community colleges make up the nations' largest public system. >>> joseph naso has been granted extra time to prepare for his murder trial. joseph naso is defending himself against four counts of murder in the 1970ss and 1990s. a judge granted him aquarial delay -- a trial delay after he requested it. it was set to begin in november but the judge pushed jury selection to january 14. >>> a school student is facing disciplinary action for bringing a air soft pist tool school. -- pistol to school. he threatened to hurt anyone who reported him. officials say they notified his parents and looking in to consequences. >>> the regular refs are back on the field tonight after they reached a deal yesterday to t
. samuel popkin who is a professor of political science at the university of san diego. he has worked on campaigns going back to the 1970s, and he is also the author of "the candidate." welcome back inside "the war room," profez or. >> it's a pleasure to be back with you governor. >> jennifer: all right. do you think this has been taken to a new level this year? >> i think it has been taken to a new level every year and gets more mindless meaningless and irrelevant every year. >> jennifer: i love that. because? because? is it going to matter? >> no, nobody cares what you thought going in. if you think your team is going to lose and they lose is that better than if you think they are going to win and they lose. [ laughter ] >> what counts is what happens in the debate not what you tell people. this is like a high school pep rally. >> jennifer: all right. i want to talk a little bit about prep because you had some very interesting experiences. you played ronald reagan for jimmy carter ahead of the 1980 debates, and in your book you write this about what hand to preside
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
's this big. so at least it's shrinking. >> that is some science right there. >> sometimes it gets down to something that simple. >>> here it is on the radar. earlier, a couple of hours ago, you had areas from frederick to warrenton all the way down south that had the moderate and heavy rain. now it is a much smaller area. you can see it as we go ahead and zoom in. moderate pockets of heavy rain still happening along 29 from columbia to bethesda in d.c., woodbridge, clinton, even diehl. all of that is headed east through areas of anne arundel county and prince george's county over the next hour. rain falling. still have a southwest wind. later today, we'll have more of a westerly wind. that will be as this weather front finally comes through. that is why i think our best chance for afternoon showers and storms will be areas east and along i-95 and down across southern maryland. as far as the weekend goes, a lot of folks asking about the weekend. i think that front will be well south and east. sunshine around the area for saturday. a little area of low pressure on sunday. could bring jus
way. and there's a great quote on this, you have to build the science of human relationships. and it is a science. maybe somebody should talk to the president and say, look, this is a scice tmaster. i do think, mika,his afedernance at home and abroad. i do think there is too much anecdotal evidence. talked about the senate democratic caucus and iust read thesila98 rounds of golf. anybody play golf with the guy? and nobody. >> nobody. because he doesn't -- he doesn't do the -- >> you think he should be having deep and intense meetings with nenyah >> tce6: the morning, i don't know if you think i'm a 3-year-old, but i'm not even going to waste my breath at 6:18 in the morning answering these false connections. but i will tell you what he needs to do. >>t's also aalse argument. >> it's not a false argunt, mi it's a matter of history. >> when he totally trumps romney completely in that. >> can i ask you a question? >> no. >> i'm going to ask you a question. hothn- >> you want to hear? >> i think this is how we help the middle east is i think we need to get somof these pills from
, language arts, maps and science. he's the athletic director, basketball coach and student council co-advisorier -- adviser. here's what's going to happen today -- a substitute teacher is in place he will be in place today and tomorrow and then on monday, what they will do is take his classes and distribute the kids to other classes. and that's how it is going to work. the counselors are also in place today. we talked about parents having questions. parents can ask the administrators but certainly a lot of questions. a lot of people that we've told about what happened. certainly are shocked and upset. we tried to talk to some neighbors of the teacher. they were upset and didn't want to talk about the situation. but apparently the home he was arrested in is one that he grew up in. the family has been there for years. claudine wong, ktvu channel 2 news. >> thank you. >>> in antioch, some parents are angry saying they are not notified about a student who brought a gun to school. the turner school principal said -- said the incident happened last wednesday but the letters did not go out u
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: thanks for staying with us. i'm bill o'reilly. three hot topics, beginning with another unbelievable aclu campaign. this one in michigan. they're asking a federal judge to prohibit a checkoff box on voting registration applications that asserts the person voting is a citizen of the united states. they don't want that. here now, attorneys of fox news analyst kimberly gill guilfoyle and his wheel. who is it going to hurt and suppress? >> suppress everybody in michigan because everyone will be confused. >> bill: confused. >> are you a u.s. citizen? >> bill: that's going to confuse nerve. >> that's what the aclu is saying. i hate to agree with you. i hate it. >> bill: this is just madness and stupidity. >> yes. >> bill: more aclu taking up the time of the courts. >> they're saying the process -- >> due process. >> confuse the issue, which you have to say you're an american citizen. >> bill: you know why they're doing this, don't you? >> of course, because they want to
acknowledges and celebrates recovery from addiction and mental illness, of advances int science -- through evidence based practices and thousands upon thousands of united voices of recovery across the country. recovery has captured an audience and is rallying in nations. about this time two years ago leaders and the liberal health field, consisting of people in recovery from mental health and substance abuse, met -- in on these efforts and in consultation with many stakeholders, samhsa has come up with a working definition and set of principles for recovery. i invite you to go on for .samhsa.gov.ww defining it has been a true process. now we are working with persons and recovery for mental illness and substance abuse to articulate the differences. as well as the commonalities of these respective prophecies. we agree on the guiding principles to recovery through terms and concepts such as hope pacs, a person driven, a holistic work. many pathways, relational, culture, addressing a trauma, strength and responsibility, and respect. a bit later in the program you will hear directly from a few
schoolers to pursue science and engineering using only digital cameras and telescopes, they studied the brightens of stars and how it varies over times. >> one of the many types when an amateur astronomer can help the scientific community more than a professional can. >>> - - >> they find out tonight if they win. >>> complaints about a notorious foreclosure process are already dropping as the nation's landmark settlement is just about to go in effect. the deals between states and the largest lenders starts tomorrow. complaints about dual tracking dropped by 50% last month. that's when banks begin foreclosure proceedings at the same time as they're working on loan modifications. that practice is restricted under this new settlement. >>> we are following development news in hayward coming up in two minutes the new detail we're uncovering about a serious shooting just moments after officers arrive. >>> this couple dedicated they're lives to feeding the homes. but now they're ready to step aside and the question is, who's going to take over their job? mother nature's cool like that. mo
. >> the original or the newer ones? >> the original. come on, i'm a science person. >> it's hard to get your mind around something that significant, though. it's really crazy. >> spectacular stuff. fortunately, we know you can get your mind around the forecast. >>> i was just outside sampling the air. it's going to be one of those days where your hair does the wonky thing. >> it's already doing it. >> and we've got a little breeze out there too. it's like a damp breeze blowing. not good for hair. as far as today goes, let's head outside. normally, we'd be showing you the sunrise, but now the sun is rising later, setting earlier. in fact, now through march 16th of next year we have less than 12 hours of daylight. boo. that's all i have to say about that. ellicott city, maryland, at 59 degrees. gaithersburg from montgomery county to howard county. reston, virginia, 58 degrees. fort washington, maryland, currently coming in at 63 degrees. temperatures are up from where we've been the last couple of mornings. again, a little breeze out there. some of you may feel just a little chilled. on storm team
to go. it is the way of the future. and with the science advancing as rapidly as it is, i think it makes good sense. >> unless you're going to replace the experts -- and that's what those guys are, experts -- with experts, then it's potentially a problem. >> d.c. police says the city has not hired enough officers and has stretched the force too thin. >>> this morning parks and service will announce the contractor picked to repair the earthquake damaged washington monument. the monument sustained serious structural damage in last year's 5.2 magnitude quake. the top of the obelisk has large cracks. the repairs are expected to cost $15 million. the monument won't reopen until sometime in 2014. look for the latest on "news 4 midday" at 11:00 and on our website, nbcwashington.com of. >>> a major casino and gaming company wants to buy a stake in the largest gaming center maryland live. penn national gaming, which also jones rosecroft race way in prince george's county wants to buy a stake in maryland live. penn national has been trying to defeat maryland's gaming bill, and their hollywood casi
team 4 meteorologist veronica johnson. >> it is cool. science is always cool. and the fact we've got fog out. what makes fog form? the clear sky and calm winds. >>> it is pretty calm right now. the rain has moved out. a lot of moisture. that's the area that had the heavy rain. dense fog advisory for fauquier county, spotsylvania county, and off to the west in albemarle county. we're at 63 in fairfax and reston. areas around calvert, 63. franconia, your hometown forecast. 7:00 a.m., still cloud cover around the area. 68 degrees around 7:00. low 70s, some sunshine around noon. after 3:00 today, when you really want to keep an eye on the sky, especially areas south of d.c. around southern maryland over toward rappahannock again, the same areas that had the heavy rain yesterday. 81 with a 40% chance of rain for today. your seven day forecast coming up in a couple of minutes. right now first 4 traffic. >> thanks, veronica. >>> right now tracking breaking news on the roadway. if you're traveling the dulles access road eastbound, still seeing all the eastbound lanes of the access road block
thousand dollars and i will pay my teachers $75,000 a year too. come on. this is not rocket science. it is hard political work. the political will to meet the needs of children whose needs have never been matched is hard. >> come in. >> richard's argument is frustrating and personal honestly because their statistical likelihood of graduating high school would be less than 50% and we can say that is okay and we are making progress. that is not okay. we have to take a totally different look at what we're doing in public education and rethink it and say how the we take what we found in small isolated pockets and figure out how to get them to millions of kids who need them and that is a massive challenge. none of us are underestimating the size of this challenge. i am trying to argue we have indications of what those elements are. in new york city public schools from k-12 the personal the likelihood of me graduating with a diploma was 5%. five% of kids graduated special-education students from new york city public schools and i went on to graduate from high school and had great teachers
in a prison fight. it nathan leopold basically will his body to science. biological tests, subjected his body to biological tests and it pulled the point. the thing that is ironic about it. the judge, the man who was the judge in that trial did not accept clarence darrow's argument. he sentenced them to life imprisonment because he was convinced in his memoirs he was convinced it would be the more cruel thing, the more cruel punishment. so clarence darrow never knew that this judge did not accept his argument. he actually made a wonderful argument against the death penalty, but the judge did not accept it. anyway. >> it is a famous argument, and it is a classic darrow argument in that it does not start at a endo disease. it starts as a end then it backtracks and wonders of them bring up in and no and be. if you talk for three days you can't go from aided be. the total impression will be lost. he had to sort of read back like of be looking for a flower. and one of the things that he consistently did in the trial, illinois had never executed teenager's in a case where they pled guilty, and so h
-driving cars, yes, i said self-driving cars, governor jerry brown called the vehicles "science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality." >> they're closer to being reality than you might think. in fact, abc's jim avila h already taken one out for a test drive. >> reporter: you have seen this -- cars that slam on the brakes before you hit a pole. but here's something you have never seen. the car of the future making the driver totally unnecessary. no hand. google is working on one. and the federal government is sponsoring a field test in ann arbor, michigan with cars that automatically swerve past potential accidents and alert you to oncoming hazards. and now this at general motors' test track, i sat in the driver's seat as this cadillac at high speeds stayed in its lane. at 60 miles an hour it stopped on its own even when a car driving 30 miles slower pulleden front of us. >> we can foresee the day when vehicles will avoid collisions. >> reporter: it has been a car maker's dream since george jetson sat in his automated flying car. >> the vehicle can take complete control and take you to your destin
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
. >> yeah. >> 17th in science. 14th in reading, and yet the u.s. spends just about as much as any other country per pupil. people are wondering what are we spending our money on then? >> well, you know, part of the problem we've got is we've got a very diverse country compared to some of the smaller countries where all the kids are coming to school pretty well prepared. they are not hungry. they are not poor. in our country, you know, we've got poor kids and some kids who have deep troubles at home, but there's no doubt that we can step up our game, and this is a big argument and a big difference that i've got with governor romney in this election, because they talk a good game about reform, but when you actually look at their budgets, they are talking about slashing our investment in education by 20%, 25%. we've already seen 300,000 teachers that have been fired across the country, and as a consequence class sizes have gone up by 5%. >> let me ask you about no child left behind. the administration has granted waivers to states because congress hasn't amended the law, allows them to not
farnsworth, political science professor at the university in virginia on a campaign 2012 and virginia's role as a swing state. also, anthony sanders of george mason university on housing prices. washington journal," lived with your phone calls, every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> see the first of the presidential debates next wednesday, live on c-span, c- span radio, c-span.org and online. . watch ending date. tonight, a debate at the texas tribune festival between mayor julian castro and ted cruz. and then political fact checkers look at it statements from the obama and ronnie campaigns. then debates for california's seventh congressional district. >> to texas politicians, each touted as the future of their parties, debated the economy, immigration, and other issues at the "texas tribune" festival in austin. julian castro is the mayor of saying antonio and was the keynote speaker at the republican convention. tedthis is one hour. >> i think you know the drill today. i hope you will enjoy as many of those as you can. if you have phones and you're agram,ing to tweet or instr we ask you to
before, is a science and technology, not for profit policy think tank, if you will for the washington, d.c., area that focuses on how science and technology affects our national security. for quite some time, we have been involved in the study of issues in and around what people call acementic threats. and most importantly terrorism. this past year, professor al sander an i realize released our second volume on al qaeda about the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11. i would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available here and on the web and amazon. all the good things. i want to highlight it today. it's one of the gifts we are going to give to the members for takes the time out of their busy schedule to join us today. i can patrol you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second work that the institute has been evolved in is the wefort the corporation to look at the cyber issue in particular cyber doctorate. that volume ed kitted by tim and i is in publication as we speak. so you a short flier of that summarizes what is in the volume. it will be out shortly
cyber networks and systems safe. we have a strong science and technology directorate that has worked cooperatively to develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. among its many projects, it is leading efforts to develop more secure internet protocol to protect consumers and industry. because each member of the public plays an important role in cyber security, which sponsored a campaign which is a year-round effort designed to engage and challenged americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe on-line practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. if you are not already a friend of the campaign, i encourage you to join today. in a few days, we will kick off national cyber security awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and resilient cyber environment. we must work internationally because the cyber criminals do not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from an
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> 23 past the hour your fox news minute. a man behind the anti islamic video that sparked deadly protests in the middle east is behind bars in los angeles. he told a judge his remain as martin yusef. he was convicted of check fraud violation. he was a flight risk. following a protest against austerity measures in spain and greece marchers took to the streets in italy causing the closure of the area. two large unions led a march of 30,000 people that clogged streets and snarled traffic during morning rush hour and the real nfl referees went back last night now that the lock over is over. the officials returns to the field for the game between the baltimore ravens and the cleveland browns and were greeted by a standing ovation from plans -- fans. cheryl: halfway through the game they went back to yelling but that is another story. thank you very much. the federal reserve making its first data dumped on discount window rending under dodd-frank. rich eds
, science and technology, energy and development. all efforts that can spark economic growth for all our people and stabilize change. but such efforts require mutual respect and interest. no government or company, no school or ngo will be confident working in a country in which people are in danger. four partnerships to be effective, our citizens must be secure. our efforts must be welcome. the politics -- politics based on anger and dividing the world between us and them not only setback international initiatives, it undermines all of us. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hand of extremism. on the same day are some plans were killed in benghazi, a turkish police officer was murdered in istanbul only days before his wedding. others were killed in a car bomb. seral afghan children were marred by their children just days after they were killed by a suicide bomber in kabul. the violence may initially be focused on the west, but over time, it cannot be contained. the same impulses towards extremism are used to justify war between sunni and shiites. it leads not to st
political science at the university. virginia, democrats' line, hello. caller: professor farnsworth just spoke about the financial part of it. a lot of people are not aware of the koch brothers' part in everything, the citizens united thing, the supreme court, not aware that clarence thomas has a financial conflict of interest, due to his wife's role as the ceo of liberty central, and that the koch brothers -- their ancestry comes from hitler -- not from hitler, but from nazi germany. their grandparents were part of nazi germany, connected to concentration camps. they have done a lot of polluting -- host: your question for art guest? caller: why are the people who are the biggest threat to democracy but emphasized? -- not emphasized? why aren't the koch brothers exposed more? host: professor farnsworth, if you wish. guest: i think the color bang's concerns connect -- caller's concerns speak to the need for greater transparency in our system. when you talk about a group that is citizens for a better tomorrow, or citizens for a good vision for the future, who is behind that? where is their
looking like? how are we thinking about science research as it relates to the child's first grade year and all the way up through young adulthood. how are we understanding their capacity to learn? are we harnessing the bat? i went to get quickly three examples -- how are we harnessing that? i want to give quickly three examples. when i your the debate in the newspaper, they missed it again -- when i read the debate in the newspaper, i am surprised at how they missed it again. when the candidates are talking about middle class families, about the in the mind ai children. who are taking care of the children all the parents are working? are the professionals who are with them, are the able to ride learning opportunities -- provide learning opportunities and engage them to explore the art world and connect with them and a cherished their curiosity and help them build upon that? are the professionals in these settings able to give that to children? do they have the training to do that? are the introducing them to art, music, math, storytelling? any other opportunities that can allow them to
and how are we thinking about the new development science research as relates to first, second, third grade in all the way up to young adulthood. are we understand their capacity to learn and army harnessing that? our would like to give three examples of where icing canada to well to be making a stronger case and are not. where when i hear the debates, i say they miss it again. how could they not make this connection? the first one for me -- improving conditions and job opportunities for the middle class. when candidates are talking about middle-class families, they have in their mind a picture of a family with children. who is taking care of those children with their parents are working? arledge child-care professionals with them able to provide those learning opportunities in terms of of lawmen them to explore their world -- of allowing them to explore their world, helping them build upon a curiosity. do they have the training they need to do that? are the introducing them to art, music, movement, math skills, storytelling, and the other opportunities that enable them to develop the
have a very strong science and technology directorate that works collaboratively to research, develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. so among its many projects, s and t is leading efforts to develop and deploy more secure internet protocols to protect consumers and industry internet users. and because each member of the public plays an important role in cybersecurity, we sponsor the stop, think, connect campaign. this is a year-round national public awareness effort designed to engage and challenge americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe online practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. so if you're not already a friend of stop, think, connect -- the stop, think, connect campaign, i encourage you to join today. and in just a few days, we will kick off national cybersecurity awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure and resilient cyber environment. finally, we must work internation
of science fiction. but it is quite, quite real. take a look at this. this is an ear that doctors at johns hopkins grew on the arm of a cancer patient. an ear growing on an arm. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now live from atlanta. elizabeth, we've been looking at this picture all morning. explain it to me. what's going on here? >> john, i don't know if you saw it, i went like this, still even though i've seen it so many times. it's such an eye-popping image. what's going on here is that a woman named sherry walter had cancer, skin cancer on her ear, and they needed to remove almost all of her outer ear. plus some of the structures that were inside because the cancer had spread. and so what they did was they thought, wow, i wonder if we could grow her an ear. they took some cartilage from her ribs and fashioned it into the shape of an ear, but this doesn't look like the real ear, it needed skin. so they put the cartilage that was shaped into an ear under her arm and they waited four months. the skin grew over it. they took it out, and they put it on her head and she
show relative to cutting-edge health and science. because so often it's at odds with what conventional thinking is. so what i offer is the options to alternative health. bio -- hormones for women and men. new ways to treat your heart rather than taking a statin. i'm bringing scientists and doctors onto my show, allowing them a platform, wrapped in glamour. i have a million dollar set and a million dollar wardrobe and great shoes. >> we believe that. >> something for everybody. >> eye candy, right? we were talking earlier, i was telling alina, i used to watch you all the time when i was growing up. >> i'm so happy about that. >> everybody. you're known as an actress. she was just so dumb. but then i heard her talk. and it was a stereotype. you played a really great role. but really, you kind of were part of the feminist movement. >> well that's good. that's good. that's why i wanted to renegotiate. no, no, no, i'm acting. i was telling you earlier that when i renegotiated after the five-year mark, the network people thought that they were negotiating with chrissy snow. and so, they made
and science. if you look at higher ed the university system we have the best universities in the world. what's the difference? universities are competitive, compete for professors, research contracts, students. k through 12 a monopoly. you have a public monopoly on one side and capitalism, competition on the other side. we excel where there's competition, we suck where there's none. >> we're not going to talk about health care now but that's going to become much less competitive and much less private sector involvement as well and that's 20% of the economy. >> well at least the public has kind of expressed its public opinion on it. >> 53-43. it's not going to be repealed if president obama gets reelected. >> unlikely. >> it's 53-43. >> 53-43 and you haven't had anything -- >> disapprove-approve or obama. >> you haven't had let's rip money out of the medicare part of it and the promises about lower health care premiums have certainly not survived. i mean we've seen, what, 8% or 9% increase in health care premiums the last two years. >> craig barrett of intel is going to be our guest host for
sense, it said that many doctors are not doing it. we did not really have a system for doing it. science explodes with information. we have new services that are mind-boggling. but the coordination of services and the standardization of best practices has lagged behind. one of the great things that i described in my book are the new generation of doctors. they think differently. they expect transparency in every aspect of life. that generation looks different from the old guard. they tend to be a second career, older, more women, and they try holistic care. they do yoga. they think differently and they expect honesty and they have very little tolerance for not telling the truth. they are changing health care today. that is one of the exciting things happening. host: dr. makary, to the states vary in how much accountability and transparency there is? guest: trend -- tremendously. not only to the state medical boards very, -- vary, but whether or not you know about your doctor's criminal background varies depending on what state you live in. some states make the complication rate public a
to actually do something that will be good for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and bu
of the house, science, space, and technology committee as well as a confer rei on -- conferee on the faa committee, i realize making the skies safer, less congested, and cleaner requires substantial investments. we must invest in the future, but we have to invest wisely. i'm concerned with the department of transportation, inspector general's april 2012 # report that the en route implementation schedule slipped by four years, and over budgeted by $330 million. in addition, i understand that although progress is being made, the agency has had difficulties in developing performance metrics for next generation goals. i want to thank you chairman petri and ranking member costillo, for holding the hearing, and i look forward to the testimony of the witnesses today because i believe we have to implement the next generation technology. thank you, and i yield back. >> thank you, and now we turn to the first panel, and i'd like to welcome the honorable john portcari, the u.s. secretary of the department of transportation, the acting administrator of the faa. welcome to both of you, and our regula
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